Saturday, October 23, 2010

Tech Camp Presentation: Simple Grammar Exercises

Pablo Picasso. Night Fishing at Antibes. 1939









Welcome to the Room 325 Language Lab.

If you already have an account with blogger, sign into your blog and click “new post”. Entitle your post “Grammar Exercise”.

If you don’t have a blogger account, click on the link, or cut and paste the following in your browser’s URL field:

(Or, you may prefer to use this test field instead of experimenting within your blog.)

Webpage Test
http://www.howstuffworks.com/web-page-test.htm

This is a little window where you can try out the html codes we'll be using. To use a second window, type control+N.

I. Input field plus drop down menu. For example:

I _____ a student. (be)

(input style="width:10ex"type="text")(select)(option)(option)am(/select)"

Only, instead of "(" use "<". And instead of ")" use ">".

This code is in two parts.

The first part:

(input style="width:10ex"type="text") creates a box where the student writes an answer. In this case, the correct form of the present tense of “be”.

The input field has two parts, “style” and “type”. The style in this case is the width of the input box. “ex” means 7px or pixels. 15ex gives you plenty of room to enter one word. type=”text” will give you a box, the length of 15ex for the answer to be written.

The second part:
(select)(option)(option)am(/select)

This is a very simple yet powerful formula for a drop down menu. By writing two options, you are concealing the answer. After the second option, write the answer and the student can then check his/her answer by clicking on the drop down menu.

Here's what it should look like:

I a student. (be)

Assignment: play with the combination of input field plus drop down menu for any grammar you want to teach. You can lengthen your width if you want student to write whole sentences, for example changing statements to yes/no questions. For a whole sentence, I use 70ex.

You can see many examples of this type of exercise on my blog:
Mission Language Lab
http://missionlanguagelab.blogspot.com

II. Drop down menu plus drop down menu.

You may want to just have a multiple choice exercise. Here is one simple way to do it:

The Livingston family lives (select)(option)(option)on(option)at(option)in (/select) 368 Valencia Street. (select)(option)answer(option)at(/select)

This will give you the following:

The Livingston family lives 368 Valencia Street.

You will notice that now the second drop down menu says "answer". This is a cue for the student to click on the second drop down menu to get the answer.

Assigment: Create grammar exercises where students must choose the correct answer out of three or four possibilities. This style of exercise is good for students who do not as yet have sufficient typing skills.

III. Different kind of input possibilities.

You can create a radio button input instead of text, like this:

1. Alexander Graham Bell invented the _________ .(form)
a. (input type="radio" name="1") radio
b. (input type="radio" name="1") telephone
c. (input type="radio" name="1") refrigerator
d. (input type="radio" name="1") airplane (/form)
(select)(option)answer(option)telephone(/select)

2. The first assembly line was developed by ____________ .(form)
a. (input type="radio" name="1") Thomas Edison
b. (input type="radio" name="1")The Wright Brothers
c. (input type="radio" name="1") George Bush
d. (input type="radio" name="1") Henry Ford(/form)
(select)(option)answer(option)Henry Ford (/select)


And your exercise will look like this:

1. Alexander Graham Bell invented the _________ .

a. radio
b. telephone
c. refrigerator
d. airplane



2. The first assembly line was developed by ________ .

a. Thomas Edison
b. The Wright Brothers
c. George Bush
d. Henry Ford



Two points: name="1" is entered so that you can only choose one answer.

(form)(/form) is entered so that answering question 2 doesn't erase the answer in question 1. Try it both ways, with or without the form tags to see what occurs.

If you don't want to be bothered with (form) and name="1", consider using checkbox like this

John ___________ a lawyer.
a. (input type="checkbox") wants be
b. (input type="checkbox") want be
c. (input type="checkbox") wants to be
d. input type="checkbox") want to be
(select)(option)answer(option)wants to be(/select)

If in your post you change your rounded brackets to pointy ones, you will see this:

John ___________ a lawyer.
a. wants be
b. want be
c. wants to be
d. want to be


With the check box, the students click the box again to erase an answer they don't want.

Assignment: Write a multiple choice quiz using radio buttons or checkboxes or both. Use at least three questions.


IV. Using value=" " to cue an edit.
Consider this code:

Change the following sentences if they are incorrect. Click on the drop down menu to see the right answer.
(input style="width:70ex" type="text" value="I no have a registration form")
(select)(option)(option)I don't have a registration form.(/select)

You will get:

Change the following sentences if they are incorrect. Click on the drop down menu to see the right answer.




I use value=" " for this spelling practice exercise.

V. "W3Schools.com" has useful html info. Follow this link to learn about tables.

Tables Tutorial


I use tables without borders for a list of words. Students chose from the list to do a cloze exercise.

For example: Final "F"

This next link is a short article on education by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, a philosopher/psychologist who has recognized the phenomenon of "flow": peak moments of creativity in our lives:

Thoughts on Education by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi.

"We learn something primarily because we find the task enjoyable, not because it is useful."

And now, a very important pronunciation lesson. You will notice that this student has some difficulty saying, "I would like to buy a hamburger." This video illustrates the virtue of patience in one on one learning situations.




template for checkbox quiz

1.
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b.
c.
d.


2.
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8.
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9.
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10.
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d.

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